Hy Brasil

The island called “Hy Brasil” came to my interest during another of the Ancient Aliens episodes on the History channel called “Contacts”.

A military man said he and a comrad came upon some type of unidentifiable object in a forest and on the outside it had binary code on it. The code was written down later and deciphered by a computer programmer much later and it turned out to have some kind message and these coordinates. I have no idea how sold I am on this, because it is highly unlikely that someone in shock of finding this kind of object out in the middle of no where could remember the amount of binary code it would require to compile this large of a message.

source of exact info from: therendleshamforestincident.com/Hy_Brasil.html

Rendlesham UFO Binary Code Decoded: Hy-Brasil

EXPLORATION [of ] HUMANITY

52 09’42.532″ N 13 13’12.69″ W

CONTI [NUOUS]
FOR PLANETARY ADVAN [CE ]

Hy Brasil Map

Brasil showing up on the map of Ireland by Abraham Ortelius in 1572

52 09’42.532″ N 13 13’12.69″ W

 

Hy Brasil

Other Names

“Hy-Brasil, the other Atlantis”

Hy-Brasil is also spelled Hy-Breasal, Hy-Brazil, Hy-Breasil, Brazir and related variations.

It may be the reason that the South American country, Brazil, was so named. The central image on the Brazilian flag, a circle with a channel across the center, is the symbol for Hy-Brasil on early maps.The name of Hy-Brasil may come from the Middle Ages term brazil, which seems to indicate a source of rare red dye. The dye may have acquired its name from the legendary island, or vice versa.

Or, the name Hy-Brasil, also called the Fortunate Island, may originate with the old Irish word, breas, meaning noble or fortunate.

In folklore, this island country takes its name from Breasal, the High King of the World, in Celtic history.

(He may or may not be related to Bresal Echarlam mac Echach Baethlaim, from the stories of Lugh at Tara. He was not St. Breasal, although pre-Christian folklore may be the foundation for that saint’s legends.)

Dates Hy Brazil is Found on Maps

Between 1300 & 1800 AD
Hy-Brasil was noted on maps as early as 1325, when Genoese cartographer Dalorto placed the island west of Ireland. On successive sailing charts, it appears southwest of Galway Bay.

On some 15th century maps, islands of the Azores appear as Isola de Brazil, or Insulla de Brazil.

After 1865, Hy-Brasil appears on few maps since its location could not be verified.

This block quote was taken directly from a section at: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brasil_(mythical_island) Nautical charts identified an island called “Bracile” west of Ireland in the Atlantic Ocean as far back as 1325, in a portolan chart by Angelino Dulcert. Later it appeared as Insula de Brasil in the Venetian map of Andrea Bianco (1436), attached to one of the larger islands of a group of islands in the Atlantic. This was identified for a time with the modern island of Terceira in the Azores

A Catalan chart of about 1480 labels two islands “Illa de brasil”, one to the south west of Ireland (where the mythical place was supposed to be) and one south of “Illa verde” or Greenland.

On maps the island was shown as being circular, often with a central strait or river running east-west across its diameter. Despite the failure of attempts to find it, this appeared regularly on maps lying south west of Galway Bay until 1865, by which time it was called Brasil Rock.

Regardless of the name or location, the island’s history is consistent: It is the home of a wealthy and highly advanced civilization. Those who visited the island returned with tales of gold-roofed towers and domes, healthy cattle, and opulent citizens.

The lore of Hy-Brasil is equally fascinating. For example, it is shrouded in fog or perhaps beneath the ocean, and appears only briefly, once every seven years.

The island had been visited by many people for centuries. Both Saint Barrind and Saint Brendan found the island on their respective voyages, and returned home with nearly identical descriptions of Hy-Brasil, which they dubbed the “Promised Land.”

One of the most famous visits to Hy-Brasil was in 1674 by Captain John Nisbet of Killybegs, Co. Donegal, Ireland. He and his crew were in familiar waters west of Ireland, when a fog came up. As the fog lifted, the ship was dangerously close to rocks. While getting their bearings, the ship anchored in three fathoms of water, and four crew members rowed ashore to visit Hy-Brasil.

52 degrees 09′ 42.532″ N
13 degrees 13′ 12.69″ W

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